Kimberly Robinson, Patrick Robinson, Steve Shay and David Rosen
The photographs of West Seattle Herald photojournalists will be on display Oct. 20 at Alki Arts for a one night only show. Large prints, matted prints, and cards will all be on display and available for sale. Top- Photo by Kimberly Robinson, 2nd row down, Patrick Robinson, 3rd row down, Steve Shay, 4th row down, David Rosen. CLICK THE PHOTO ABOVE TO SEE THESE IMAGES LARGER.

SLIDESHOW: Meet the West Seattle Herald's photojournalists at a very special exhibition Oct. 20

Steve Shay, David Rosen, Patrick and Kimberly Robinson will show their work

Those who subscribe to the West Seattle Herald in print, or follow our publication on Facebook (or one of our apps) know that we put a high value on the quality of our photography.

On Saturday, October 20, you will have a chance to meet four of our photographers as a very special photographic exhibition being held at Alki Arts, 2820 Alki Avenue SW. The show will run from 6 to 9pm.

Steve Shay, David Rosen, Patrick and Kimberly Robinson will be showing some of their work, which you may not have seen before. Large framed prints, matted prints, and greeting cards will all be part of the show.

Wine and light appetizers will be served and the Latin Jazz quartet Todo Es will provide live music.

The event is free. If you are on Facebook you can RSVP here.

You can read the photographer's bios below.

Steve Shay
A journalist for 30 years, Steve Shay has been with Robinson Newspapers for over five years, and works for their Burien-based Highline Times, the West Seattle Herald, and Ballard News-Tribune as a reporter and photographer, and often hunts for his own stories. He covered the trial of West Seattle-raised Amanda Knox, publishing over 45 stories on her ordeal through the eyes of her family and acquaintances. He is also proud of his coverage of the Duwamish Tribe, marriage equality, homelessness, and the Ballard-connected Deadliest Catch TV show.

Raised in the Chicago area, Steve freelanced for the Chicago Tribune, Chicago Sun-Times, and various neighborhood weeklies as a photographer and feature writer where he covered such notables as Dizzy Gillespie, Julia Child, Ray Bradbury, Maya Angelou, and, in a 1992 concert, Chicago-raised Edward Louis Severson III, a.k.a. Eddie Vedder, who leaped from the balcony into the sea of excited fans at the Metro/Smart Bar, one block north of Wrigley Field. That predated the newspaper's digital cameras, when 1600 ASA film was crucial to capture that mid-air moment.

While he took some formal training, it was Steve's father, Arthur, now 90, who mentored Steve in journalism, particularly photography, and making it a challenging and enjoyable career. Arthur Shay is a former Time/Life Magazine journalist who photographed the first, fateful Kennedy-Nixon debate for Time Magazine in Chicago’s WBBM-TV studios Sept. 26, 1960.

Steve lives on Alki with his girlfriend, Laura Wold, a fourth-generation Ballardite with a legacy of brave, Nordic fishermen.
See more of Steve's work here: http://steveshayphotography.com

David Rosen
David Rosen works for the West Seattle Herald as a breaking news photojournalist and often responds to calls involving car wrecks, house fires, and other breaking stories. He has been with Robinson Newspapers for over two years. David is also a landscape photographer and has traveled all over the region to capture photos of our area's remarkable natural beauty.

David was born in Seattle, WA and grew up in the Roanoke Park neighborhood but now resides in West Seattle. He first started taking photos when he was a young kid but got more into it when he was in high school. In 2006, David started his own photography business called SlickPix Photography.

David's work has been featured on most of our local television stations, and has appeared in the Seattle Times. Five of his photos recently appeared in the Space Needle's 50th anniversary book.

David lives near the Alaska Junction with his Fiancé Kendra.
See more of David's work here http://www.slickpixphotography.com

Kimberly Robinson
Kimberly Robinson was born and raised in West Seattle. A life long appreciation for West Seattle's parks beaches and business community has contributed to showing how interesting and beautiful our area can be in photos. With the constant encouragement from her husband, Patrick Robinson, and her father-in-law, Gerald Robinson, contributing to the family business just came naturally.

Kim sees photos from a feminine perspective with a lot of emphasis on color. Most of her training was from Patrick, reading, a few classes, and hours and hours of practice. Kim says " I like to show everyone and every situation in a pleasing way even when it is less than perfect. "

Patrick Robinson
Patrick Robinson has been taking pictures since he was 12 years old and along the way used every camera format in film, expanded to video, and has worked in creative endeavors his entire life. He worked as a photographer for the Herald first in 1975 and went on to win numerous awards for photography and advertising. His background includes creating the first all digital video production facility in the world in the 1980's, music composition and production (including jingles), and advertising in almost every form that exists. He has served as a consultant to northwest video production companies and for Carsey-Werner Productions in Los Angeles where he was in charge of developing the internet presence for the company and such properties as Third Rock from the Sun, That 70's Show and others. He worked for Robinson Newspapers until 1988, leaving to become a consultant and came back in 2005 to become the Director of New Media for the company. His photography is very personal, and emotional. "I believe that art is in your mind and heart and it either works for you or it doesn't. My long experience in photojournalism has taught me that the best photos tell stories but that beautiful images are sometimes enough to reach someone and have an impact."
See more of Patrick's work on his site http://patrickrobinson.net .

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