Westside-O-Rama West Seattle Entertainment Guide

Entertainment and Venue listings

Admiral Theater
2343 California Ave. S.W.
938-3456
Movie tickets $5.50

On Tuesday, we celebrate Seniors (over 60) with one dollar off all day, $4.75. 
Tickets available at http://www.farawayentertainment.com/admiral.html
http://www.farawayentertainment.com/admiral.html

ArtsWest
4711 California Ave SW, Seattle, WA 98116
206) 938-0339

Beveridge Place Pub
6413 California Ave. S.W.
932-9906
Happy Hour: Monday through Friday, 3 to 6 p.m., Saturday and Sunday, 2 to 6 p.m.
www.beveridgeplacepub.com/

The Bridge

The Bridge
6301 California Ave. S.W.
206.402.4606
Food till Midnight every day!
OUR HOURS
MON-FRI: 11AM - 2AM
SAT & SUN: 9AM - 2AM
HAPPY HOUR Monday-Saturday
3PM -6PM (food & drinks) 11PM- 1AM (drinks only)
10% discount (on beverages) for Teachers & Military with ID

Saturday- Brunch at 9am-2pm, full menu at 2pm
Sunday- Brunch at 9am-2pm, full menu at 2pm

More ›

Sunset of the week 5-23-16

If you would like to obtain some well considered financial advice, contact Sarah Cecil 206-938-6017.

Brought to you by Sarah Cecil Financial Advisor with Edwards Jones Investments.

Sponsored post.

More ›
ArtsWest
Death of a Salesman plays now through May 29, 2016 at ArtsWest Theatre in West Seattle.

Review: ArtsWest’s Death of a Salesman

By Amanda Knox

Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman was first performed in 1949 and has since been celebrated as one of America’s greatest plays of the 20th Century. Presumably this is because of its subject matter—the debunking of the American Dream—and because of the urgency felt by the audience to witness the dissolution of this false idol depicted in a relatable way. In the play, Miller fluidly juxtaposes scenes of the promising past of an average American family, the Lomans, against their disappointing present through the eyes of the emotionally and mentally unraveling father, Willy. Their tragedy is meant to feel all too familiar, serving as an everyman example refuting American idealism: that each one of us is special, that the top of the food chain is within reach, that success is the source of happiness. The Lomans’ tragic loss of innocence finally allows for a new kind of truth to emerge—that Americans may be “a dime a dozen,” but at least we know what we truly are.

More ›