Amanda's View: Party

By Amanda Knox
 
Last week Chris and I threw a housewarming party. It used to be that a couple didn’t move in together until they were married and ready to start a family. In the 1950s, my Oma lived in an all-female dormitory, and only came into contact with men her age at specially organized dances, like the one where she met my Opa. Social norms loosened up significantly by the 1980s, but my mom was still living with her sister prior to getting married and moving in with my dad.
 
Back then, a housewarming party was like a baby shower. It was expected that the new couple needed furnishings and housewares. Furthermore, it used to be much more common that couples settled into their new homes for the long run. Even if they couldn’t afford to buy their house yet, they were investing themselves in a community. They could expect that their future kids would be riding bikes and building forts with the other kids on the block.
 

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Amanda's View: Ritual

By Amanda Knox
 

At 29, I’m fortunate to have not yet lost very many loved ones. To date: two grandparents, a great aunt, a cousin, an uncle, and a family friend. Having just returned from the funeral of one of those grandparents, I realize that I still haven’t fully wrapped my mind around the end of a life. I feel confused, and conflicted when taking part in the funeral rites which are as much concerned with respecting the dead as with reconciling the living with the general idea of death itself. It makes me wonder about what my own death will mean to the people who love me, how I would prefer that manifest itself, and whether my preference even matters.
 

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Amanda's View: At the intersection of normalcy and public-figure-hood

By Amanda Knox
 
Back in 2007, it seemed only people like me were using social media. College students. We were staying in touch with our friends from high school. We were finding out who was taking Math 221 with us next quarter. We were organizing study groups and house parties. We were socializing in a whole new environment catered to just us barely-adults. Real adults didn’t have Facebook profiles. Real adults had resumes. Social media was where we defined ourselves. It was the clubhouse where Mom and Dad weren’t allowed, where kids could be kids.
 

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