Transportation

West Seattle might get its part of the monorail before the downtown portion is built, and those gigantic support columns may be much smaller, says Cascadia Monorail Co.

Jim Devine, project manager for Cascadia, told the Seattle Monorail Project board of directors it would be quicker and easier to build the monorail in residential neighborhoods because there are fewer utility lines.

08/04/2005
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Cascadia Monorail Co.

SMALLER MONORAIL COLUMNS. Cascadia is trying to reduce the dimensions of its oval design to 3 feet 6 inches by 4 feet 3 inches. By using thicker steel reinforcements and a different type of concrete, the columns would be able to withstand an earthquake as powerful as any quake in a 2,500-year time span, the company says. This artist's sketch shows what it would look like on Second Avenue, downtown.

The Associated General Contractors said it all in a recent flyer.

"I don't want to create or preserve thousands of jobs, including my own.

"I support neglect of our state's bridges and roads.

"Our roads will fix themselves.

"That is what your signature on I-912 means."

The contractors are absolutely correct.

08/04/2005

Burien received a major boost last week when Congress approved federal funding for the city's long-term vision for downtown redevelopment.

The state's two U.S.

08/04/2005

The Community Center building at the Emergency Family Shelter operated by the Multi-Service Center just off Military Road and the Kent-Des Moines Highway, was showing its age. Then three area corporations recognized the need, stepped forward, and have created a local version of "Extreme Makeover."

Once base housing for the Navy's Nike Missile Base in the '60s and '70s, the four-block area was deeded to King County several years ago by the federal government. The King County Housing Authority then sublet the single family homes to three non-profit organizations, including MSC, to be used for housing programs. Although the site has been well-maintained since then, the homes are definitely '50s vintage architecture, and the majority of the maintenance funds have been spent for basic, functional needs...plumbing, wiring, paint and cleanup.

The Community Center, once one of the base homes, serves as a meeting ground, intake office and counseling office for the three current housing providers sharing the units: Highline Mental Health, St.

07/27/2005
MSC's Emergency Family Shelter Gets a Makeover

At the Emergency Family Shelter (left to right) Demitri Batiste, Keke Fountain and RJ Fountain helped Lorrainne Rawson, Community Lead for the Federal Way region of Starbucks. The kids were delighted to help bring in the loads of games and books donated by Starbucks customers, as they, and the 20 other children who currently call the Shelter home, each got to keep one game of their own.

What can West Seattleites expect if an earthquake takes down the Alaskan Way Viaduct?

The Seattle city police, transportation planners and emergency managers proposed an emergency closure plan for the viaduct to the Transportation Committee of the Seattle City Council July 18.

07/27/2005

When you have lunch with Mary Gates and Betty Huff, you have to accept a periodic interruption from friends of theirs. At Indochine recently, where Mary ordered a shrimp dish with a five-star degree of hotness, and Betty a more demure Thai salad, we gnoshed and talked symphony and the exciting pops program planned for August 13. Now and again, someone they knew would drift by the table (Mark Clirehugh, then Peggy Laporte) to say hello.

The very good reason for this is that these two women are among the leaders and shakers in town who makes things happen.

07/27/2005

A man leaned on his elbows at the Seattle Monorail Project board of directors' conference table and urged the board members to divide the Green Line into two $800 million halves which would cut interest payments significantly.

First build the monorail from Seattle Center to West Seattle, the man suggested.

07/27/2005

Seattle City Councilmember Richard Conlin said his success in getting legislation passed and his ability to go into any neighborhood and point his accomplishments is what makes him feel he is ready for a third term.

As chairman of the council's Transportation Committee, Conlin says his goals for the next four years are to continue to largely concentrate on addressing transportation issues and setbacks, and road, street and bridge repairs, both regionally and locally.

He is a member of a regional committee that has been lobbying for legislation to provide adequate money fo

07/27/2005
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Dean Wong

FEELS SECURE FOR NEW TERM. Despite early on drawing several opponents, some of whom have changed targets, Councilmember Richard Conlin says he feels he has a strong neighborhood base for reelection.

Is there some sort of rule in Seattle that says all proposals for advancement and change must be greeted with a loud and definitive "No"?

As soon as Southwest Airlines suggested moving its operations to cheaper quarters at Boeing Field, the nattering nabobs of negativity immediately cried "No way." The "no-way" crowd spewed their nonsense even when the airline did something that none of the promoters of sports palaces did: offer to pay for the improvements themselves.

Southwest would spend $130 million on a terminal and a parking facility.

07/27/2005

Special to the Times/News

After several years, a tug-of-war between the city of Des Moines and the Port of Seattle over the use of 90 acres of land south of Sea-Tac International Airport has been settled.

Both the city and the port recently adopted unanimously the first development agreement for the Des Moines Creek Business Park at this location.

"This is very significant," Des Moines Mayor Bob Sheckler declared.

The land, which City Manager Tony Piasecki said has sat vacant for almost 20 years, will be transformed from a property that was almost d

07/27/2005
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