Transportation

West Seattle might get its part of the monorail before the downtown portion is built, and those gigantic support columns may be much smaller, says Cascadia Monorail Co.

Jim Devine, project manager for Cascadia, told the Seattle Monorail Project board of directors it would be quicker and easier to build the monorail in residential neighborhoods because there are fewer utility lines.

08/04/2005
story01.jpg

Cascadia Monorail Co.

SMALLER MONORAIL COLUMNS. Cascadia is trying to reduce the dimensions of its oval design to 3 feet 6 inches by 4 feet 3 inches. By using thicker steel reinforcements and a different type of concrete, the columns would be able to withstand an earthquake as powerful as any quake in a 2,500-year time span, the company says. This artist's sketch shows what it would look like on Second Avenue, downtown.

The Associated General Contractors said it all in a recent flyer.

"I don't want to create or preserve thousands of jobs, including my own.

"I support neglect of our state's bridges and roads.

"Our roads will fix themselves.

"That is what your signature on I-912 means."

The contractors are absolutely correct.

08/04/2005

Burien received a major boost last week when Congress approved federal funding for the city's long-term vision for downtown redevelopment.

The state's two U.S.

08/04/2005

Up until now, the so-called "missing link" of the Burke-Gilman Trail was purely a matter of semantics. The construction of the $3.5 million segment along 54th Street and Seaview Avenue, between the Ballard Locks and Northwest 60th Street, gives the bicycling lobby exactly what they wanted: a true missing link to the controversial trail.

In and of itself, the new trail segment is not a bad thing, unless you want to count the $1.8 million from the city's general fund spent on the 0.7-mile project.

07/27/2005

The Community Center building at the Emergency Family Shelter operated by the Multi-Service Center just off Military Road and the Kent-Des Moines Highway, was showing its age. Then three area corporations recognized the need, stepped forward, and have created a local version of "Extreme Makeover."

Once base housing for the Navy's Nike Missile Base in the '60s and '70s, the four-block area was deeded to King County several years ago by the federal government. The King County Housing Authority then sublet the single family homes to three non-profit organizations, including MSC, to be used for housing programs. Although the site has been well-maintained since then, the homes are definitely '50s vintage architecture, and the majority of the maintenance funds have been spent for basic, functional needs...plumbing, wiring, paint and cleanup.

The Community Center, once one of the base homes, serves as a meeting ground, intake office and counseling office for the three current housing providers sharing the units: Highline Mental Health, St.

07/27/2005
MSC's Emergency Family Shelter Gets a Makeover

At the Emergency Family Shelter (left to right) Demitri Batiste, Keke Fountain and RJ Fountain helped Lorrainne Rawson, Community Lead for the Federal Way region of Starbucks. The kids were delighted to help bring in the loads of games and books donated by Starbucks customers, as they, and the 20 other children who currently call the Shelter home, each got to keep one game of their own.

Special to the Times/News

After several years, a tug-of-war between the city of Des Moines and the Port of Seattle over the use of 90 acres of land south of Sea-Tac International Airport has been settled.

Both the city and the port recently adopted unanimously the first development agreement for the Des Moines Creek Business Park at this location.

"This is very significant," Des Moines Mayor Bob Sheckler declared.

The land, which City Manager Tony Piasecki said has sat vacant for almost 20 years, will be transformed from a property that was almost d

07/27/2005

The Tukwila Pantry, a food bank that has been serving families in South King County for five years, has an immediate need of additional funding to continue its mission of helping hungry families

"It takes many sponsors to keep an operation like the Tukwila Pantry running," the food bank stated last week in a news release asking the community for financial assistance.

"Please help [our] volunteers continue to feed the community by sending a financial contribution."

An unanticipated rate of growth in the need of families for assistance from the Pantry is the cau

07/27/2005

TIMES/NEWS

The Highline School District received $16.2 million in state construction funds last week for the rebuilding of Mt. Rainier High School in Des Moines.

The funds were part of more than $294 million in capitol construction money released by the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) to 29 districts.

The money was approved during the 2005 legislative session.

07/27/2005

What can West Seattleites expect if an earthquake takes down the Alaskan Way Viaduct?

The Seattle city police, transportation planners and emergency managers proposed an emergency closure plan for the viaduct to the Transportation Committee of the Seattle City Council July 18.

07/27/2005

Times/News

Reaction to Southwest Airlines' announcement that it plans to move flights from Sea-Tac International Airport to Boeing Field varied widely among three Highline community leaders last week.

SeaTac Mayor Frank Hansen, whose city contains the airport, labeled Southwest's proposal a "cockamamie idea" and said the airline should "live up to the obligations" it agreed to in supporting Sea-Tac's expansion.

Normandy Park's Larry Corvari, who heads the anti-Sea-Tac expansion Regional Commission on Airport Affairs (RCAA), declared the Port of Seattle, Sea-Tac

07/27/2005
news01.jpg