Housing

The Low Income Housing Institute's proposed Ballard development would include housing for families and individuals making less than 60 percent of the median King County Income as well as space for homeless families. It would also include an Urban Rest Stop.

The Low Income Housing Institute, more commonly known as LIHI, offered new details about the project at 2014 N.W. 57th St., currently a vacant lot, during the Oct. 13 Ballard District Council meeting.

The proposed development includes 40 to 60 units, including studios, one-bedroom units and two-bedroom units, for families and individuals with incomes less than $51,360 for a four-person household and $41,100 for a two-person household.

LIHI is proposing setting aside approximately 20 percent of the units for homeless families.

LIHI would also be locating an Urban Rest Stop on the first floor of the building. The Urban Rest Stop would provide free showers and laundry, as well as bathrooms, nurses, barbers, attorneys and more, for homeless individuals and families.

10/14/2010
LIHI proposes Ballard low-income, homeless housing, Urban Rest Stop
Photo credit: 
Michael Harthorne

The Low Income Housing Institute is proposing 40 to 60 units for low-income and homeless individuals and families, as well as an Urban Rest Stop, for this vacant lot across from Wiggin & Sons Funeral Home on Northwest 57th Street.

The White Center community is preparing for the groundbreaking of Strength of Place Village, a new construction project of 30 units of affordable rental housing near the business district, close to public transit, shopping and services.

During this challenging economic climate for affordable housing developers, the White Center Community Development Association, Capitol Hill Housing and Delridge Neighborhoods Development Association have combined resources through an innovative partnership to develop Strength of Place Village.

Located on the corner of SW 100th Street and 13th Avenue SW, the project will have 30 apartments ranging from one-bedrooms to three-bedrooms for low-income families making less than about $55,000 per year. Strength of Place Village will also deliver living-wage construction jobs to White Center and will be green built to the Washington State Evergreen Sustainable Development Standard.

08/12/2010
SOPI.jpg
Photo credit: 
WCCDA

Located on the corner of SW 100th Street and 13th Avenue SW, SOPI will have 30 apartments ranging from one-bedrooms to three-bedrooms for low-income families.

Strength of Place Village Groundbreaking in White Center

Capitol Hill Housing, Delridge Neighborhoods Development Association & White Center Community Development Association invite you to join us at the Strength of Place Village project groundbreaking.

Located in the White Center neighborhood, this new development of 30 quality affordable rental housing units is the result of a unique partnership of three community based organizations.

11AM—Groundbreaking & Remarks

11:45AM—BBQ Reception at Steve Cox Memorial Park
(1321 SW 102nd Street one block south of project site)

Location

SOPI site
Intersection of 13th Avenue SW & 100th Street
White Center, WA
Groundbreaking event is Sept. 15

The White Center Community Development Association released this news about SOPI (Strength of Place Village) rental housing project set to begin construction later this summer.

The WCCDA Press Release:

The White Center community is preparing for the groundbreaking of Strength of Place Village, a new construction project of 30 units of affordable rental housing near the business district, close to public transit, shopping and services. During this challenging economic climate for affordable housing developers, the White Center Community Development Association, Capitol Hill Housing and Delridge Neighborhoods Development Association have combined resources through an innovative partnership to develop Strength of Place Village.

Located on the corner of SW 100th Street and 13th Avenue SW, the project will have 30 apartments ranging from one-bedrooms to three-bedrooms for low-income families making less than about $55,000 per year. Strength of Place Village will also deliver living-wage construction jobs to White Center and will be green built to the Washington State Evergreen Sustainable Development Standard.

08/07/2010

Though the city has not granted the project its Master Use Permit yet, the Compass Housing Alliance plans to begin construction on Urness House, its Ballard housing development for formerly homeless individuals, this winter.

M.J. Kiser, Compass program director, announced the loose construction timeline for the seven-story, 80-unit development at 1753 N.W. 56th St. at the July 14 Ballard District Council meeting.

After back-to-back State Environmental Protection Act and Design Review meetings June 14, the project appeared ready to be given the go-ahead by the city, both in terms of design and environmental impacts.

07/23/2010
Urness House.jpg
Photo credit: 
Courtesy of Weinstein A|U

Construction on Compass Housing Alliance's Urness House, seen here in rendering, is planned to get underway this winter.

Construction will start in the spring of 2011

Providence Health and Services and the King County Housing Authority have been awarded $9 million to build affordable housing for low income seniors at the companion property to the existing Greenbridge near White Center.

The Section 202 program provides capital and rental subsidies for the rehabilitation or in this case construction and operation of supportive housing for the elderly. The assistance is provided to nonprofit organizations, in this case Providence Health & Services, who will work with KCHA to construct a new 65-unit building for seniors and persons with disabilities at Seola Gardens (the companion property to Greenbridge)

They released the following press release with more details on the program.
PRESS RELEASE:

07/16/2010
aasecuredownload-2.jpg

Providence Health & Services of Washington has been awarded $9.065 million in capital and operating funds to construct new housing for low-income seniors and persons with disabilities in the King County Housing Authority’s Seola Gardens community in White Center.

Mary Dunlap became homeless at 13 and spent much of her teenage years living with friends and family. After graduating from high school, she applied to the University of Washington and was granted a full-ride scholarship.

While she said the four years of tuition are a blessing, the financial aid did not guarantee other basic living expenses. Desiring stability and structure, Dunlap moved into Crown Hill's Labateyah Youth Home in May.

“It’s more like a rent-savings program for youth," Dunlap said. "I like to think of it as a bank almost. They give you a loan in a sense."

Labateyah, located at 9010 13th Ave. N.W., was established in 1992 when founder Bearnie Whitebear noticed that Native American youth were disproportionately represented in the homeless community and often had trouble assimilating into traditional support programs. Whitebear hoped to provide Native youth with a nurturing environment and culturally relevant program.

06/24/2010
Youth Home.JPG
Photo credit: 
Michael Harthorne

The nearly two-acre Labateyah Youth Home in Crown Hill offers shelter and support for homeless youth. It received a $17,000 grant from the city in April.

Urness House, Compass Housing Alliance's 80-unit Ballard development for formerly homeless men and women, appears ready to move forward after back-to-back, standing-room only State Environmental Protection Act and Design Review meetings June 14.

The seven-story Urness House, to be located at 1753 N.W. 56th St., will offer housing for chronically homeless individuals earning less than $8,000 per year. There will also be onsite services, such as mental health clinics, substance abuse clinics and triage services. Click here to learn more about Urness House policies.

Lisa Rutzick, Seattle Department of Planning and Development project manager for Urness House, said it is unusual to have a public State Environmental Protection Act meeting, but the amount of interest raised by the project warranted one.

Ballardite's voiced concerns about negative impacts by Urness House on parking, safety and property values.

06/15/2010
Urness House.jpg
Photo credit: 
Courtesy of Weinstein A|U

A rendering of Compass Housing Alliance's Urness House for formerly homeless individuals, which looks likely to move forward after June 14 State Environmental Policy Act and Design Review meetings.

"Everything you need is here," Bryan Johnston said about his 3,500-square-foot, 98-year-old Ballard house. "There is a room for everything."

He isn't kidding.

There is the spacious living room and dining room, complete with fireplace and original woodwork. The sunroom that Bryan's wife Susan used while making calls for the 700 Club and now holds a half-played board game. A former bedroom with its own private stairwell to the kitchen so the children could eat without interrupting their parent's parties. Another former bedroom, now converted into a dressing room with tiered walk-in closet.

Add to the house's interior accommodations and surprises, the views of Puget Sound from second and third-floor balconies and a double lot-sized yard, and it becomes clear that Susan and Bryan Johnston's home isn't just any house.

"The moment you walk in, you feel something," Susan said.

In 1975, Bryan bought the house at 8344 32nd Ave. N.W. from his parents, who had purchased the house in 1943 when Bryan was 6 months old. In 1976, he started redoing the house.

06/04/2010
DSC_0087.JPG
Photo credit: 
Michael Harthorne

Bryan and Susan Johnston on the porch of their nearly century-old Ballard home, for which both have deep personal connections. CLICK IMAGE FOR MORE PHOTOS.

By John Fox and Carolee Colter

You probably don't know this because no one down at City Hall thought to tell you, let alone ask for your opinion on the matter. But quietly two weeks ago, the full Seattle City Council unanimously voted to increase the city's 20-year residential growth targets by more than 30 percent.

On top of that, they committed the city to increasing its tota