Bicyclists/Pedestrians

Seattle Department of Transportation crews will construct a missing portion of sidewalk on Third Avenue Northwest between Northwest 85th and Northwest 86th streets beginning Wednesday, Aug. 12.

One lane of traffic will be maintained in each direction. No on-street parking will be allowed in the construction area.

The crews expect to complete this work in approximately two weeks

08/11/2009

A collision between a bicyclist and a mini cooper occurred at about 7 p.m. last night at the intersection of 14th Avenue Northwest and Northwest 58th Street. The cyclist sustained minor injuries.

The 14th Avenue Northwest Visioning Project has been working on improvements to the street for the past several years. Curb bulbs and a rain garden were installed at the same intersection of the accident last winter.

In the case of last night's collision, the bicyclist was at fault because he failed to yield to the vehicle, said Mark Jamieson, a Seattle Police spokesperson.

“The cyclist did sustain some minor injuries, an injured knee and maybe had a hurt hand or finger,”Jamieson said. “They were checked out of the hospital as a precaution."

“We’ve made improvements on 14th Avenue and 58th Street Northwest and we’ve been maintaining the vegetation in the medians,” said Dawn Hemminger, member of the steering committee and East Ballard Community Association.

Hemminger said they have also asked the Seattle Department of Transportation to move the parking on 14th Avenue Northwest and Northwest 60th Street further back to improve visibility for crossing.

08/04/2009
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Photo credit: 
Google

An accident between a bicyclist and a vehicle occurred at this intersection last night at about 7 p.m. The bicyclist incurred minor injuries and will be issued a citation for failure to yield from the Seattle Police Department.

(Editor's note: Dave Kannas writes a regular column for the Ballard News-Tribune's sister publication, the West Seattle Herald.)

The jungles of the Amazon can be threatening to those of us who live in Seattle. Some of us carry around the thoughts of an anaconda wrapped around our bodies as we sleep; flesh devouring ants on the march, leaving nothing but the skeletons of those unfortunate enough to be caught napping; cooling our feet in a stream and finding that we have nothing remaining from the ankle down because a small fish has seen fit to lunch on them.

Oh, the horror!

I think of these jungles as I pedal across the vast waists of Ballard, Howler monkeys screaming in the distance, the smell of rotting vegetation clogging my nose. But wait, this is Ballard, not the Amazon. So why the hallucinations?

Could it be that Ballard is known for its Aboriginal Tribes who hunt the illusive Howler disguised as bicyclists? Could it be that these Aboriginals hunt with blow guns that are tipped with poisonous darts? Could be. Or it could be just because recently there have two bicyclists attacked with blow guns while pedaling in Ballard.

08/04/2009
Kannas.jpg
Photo credit: 
Photo courtesy Dave Kannas

The author.

The jungles of the Amazon can be threatening to those of us who live in Seattle. Some of us carry around the thoughts of an anaconda wrapped around our bodies as we sleep; flesh devouring ants on the march, leaving nothing but the skeletons of those unfortunate enough to be caught napping; cooling our feet in a stream and finding that we have nothing remaining from the ankle down because a small fish has seen fit to lunch on them.

Oh, the horror!

I think of these jungles as I pedal across the vast wastes of Ballard, Howler monkeys screaming in the distance, the smell of rotting vegetation clogging my nose. But wait, this is Ballard, not the Amazon. So why the hallucinations?

Could it be that Ballard is known for its Aboriginal Tribes who hunt the illusive Howler disguised as bicyclists? Could it be that these Aboriginals hunt with blow guns that are tipped with poisonous darts? Could be. Or it could be just because recently there have two bicyclists attacked with blow guns while pedaling in Ballard.

08/04/2009
Kannas.jpg
Photo credit: 
Photo courtesy Dave Kannas

The author.

The Seattle City Council’s Transportation and Pedestrian Safety Committees will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, July 21 at 5 p.m. in Council Chambers to hear input on the draft of the city’s proposed Pedestrian Master Plan.

The council was initially briefed on the draft in April by the Seattle Department of Transportation that, along with the Pedestrian Master Plan Advisory Group, developed the plan. It was created with a focus on making Seattle a safer, more pedestrian-friendly city.

The joint committee will receive a briefing Tuesday morning from the transportation department that will focus on input collected during its extensive public outreach process on the draft plan.

"I want to thank the Advisory Group for all of the time and effort put into this project," said council member Jan Drago. "I am really looking forward to hearing the public's feedback on it."

Public input will be used by the council to assist it in its overall review of the plan.

"Thanks to the work of the citizens Advisory Group, we are entering a new era for pedestrian safety in Seattle, toward a safe walking environment for all,” said council member Nick Licata.

07/20/2009

The Seattle Department of Transportation is proposing that the city adopt the draft Pedestrian Master Plan, which defines the steps aimed at creating a more walkable, livable and healthy city.

The plan establishes the policies, programs, design criteria, and projects that will further enhance pedestrian safety, comfort, and access in all of Seattle’s neighborhoods.

The transportation department has determined that adoption of the plan is unlikely to result in significant adverse impacts on the environment. As a result, the department issued a Determination of Nonsignificance (DNS) on Monday, July 13.

This decision was made after review of the proposal's potential impacts on several elements of the environment, summarized in the SEPA environmental checklist.

The DNS and the SEPA checklist are available on the Pedestrian Master Plan Website: http://www.seattle.gov/mostwalkablecity.htm.

The public may comment on the DNS and checklist until 5 p.m. on July 27.

In addition, anyone may appeal this DNS by submitting a Notice of Appeal and a filing fee to the Office of the Hearing Examiner no later than 5 p.m. on August 3.

07/15/2009

(Editor's note: The following letter was sent to Barbara Gray with the Seattle Department of Transportation from the Ballard District Council regarding the draft Seattle Pedestrian Master Plan.)

Dear Ms. Gray:

The Ballard District Council has completed its initial review of the draft Seattle Pedestrian Master Plan, dated May 2009. The District Council’s Neighborhood Plan Update Committee presented its draft recommendations to you following your briefing on the plan at the June 10 council meeting.

Overall, the committee was very impressed with the depth of information and detailed analysis provided in the draft Seattle Pedestrian Master Plan. We hope that this living document will become a useful tool for the city and neighborhoods when determining prioritization for projects and for setting guidelines for project identification and implementation.

We feel, however, that this draft plan is missing a few, very key, components, which we have outlined below under “Overall Recommendations," “Implementation Recommendations" and “Recommendations for Further Clarity."

Overall Recommendations

06/19/2009

Summer entices both the novice and the serious biker to abandon usual modes of transportation. Instead of driving, walking, busing, we welcome any excuse to put on our helmets (for the brave ones their spandex) to merrily pedal our way around the neighborhood.

Children gladly trail behind their parents on training wheels. Happy couples ride in sync on their tandems. Hip Ballardites sport baskets for carrying Farmer’s Market groceries. Formerly bulky bike commuters, in lieu of layers and reflective raingear, are wearing shorts and a big smile.

And with the upcoming STP (Seattle to Portland) bicycle ride on July 11 and 12, determined bikers do serious miles training for the 200-mile, two-day (some do it in one) event.

Even if you’re a beginner, summer is a great time to get into biking – it’s free (for the most part), it’s exercise, and the best part is that you get to enjoy coveted summer days.

It’s a great way to run errands around the neighborhood. Bike to nearby parks like Golden Gardens, Carkeek, or Gas Works. Cruise along the Burke-Gilman Trail to nearby neighborhood destinations like Fremont or the University District.

06/12/2009
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Photo credit: 
Michael Harthorne

A biker rolls up Northwest Market Street Friday afternoon, June 12.

The comment period for Seattle’s draft Pedestrian Master Plan has been extended to Friday, June 26. The plan is available here.

A hard copy of the plan is also available in the Seattle Room of the Central Library (1000 Fourth Ave.). Comments on the plan may be made through an online form, via email (mostwalkablecity@seattle.gov), by phone (206-733-9970), or by mail (Pedestrian Master Plan Comments, Seattle Department of Transportation, P.O. Box 34996, Seattle, WA 98124-4996).

Additionally, the Seattle City Council’s Transportation Committee and the Special Committee on Pedestrian Safety will host a public hearing on the draft plan on Tuesday, July 21, from 5 to 6:30 p.m. in the Council Chambers at City Hall (600 Fourth Ave.).

This will provide an additional opportunity to comment on the draft and proposed revisions.

06/12/2009