Libraries

Crown Hill resident Drexie Malone spent five months, from June to October, picking weeds, trimming plants and removing cigarette butts in the gardens around the Ballard Public Library. She was a volunteer, but she was also an outlaw.

The library has a strict union contract that includes gardeners, so volunteers are not allowed to participate in upkeep around the grounds, branch manager Cass Mabbott said.

Malone said she was told when she started that her gardening was not allowed, but she proceeded under a "don't ask, don't tell" policy with the library, working early on Sunday mornings while the library was closed.

In late summer, a library employee told Malone to stop her gardening and leave the work to the union gardeners.

"I amiably indicated that those hard-working gardeners could use a little help since the gardens were obviously in need of maintenance," Malone said. "I did not stop, I just worked faster each week."

Malone said the same employee asked her to stop again and brought a union gardner to talk to her. She said the gardner agreed that she could keep gardening when the library was closed.

11/25/2009
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Photo credit: 
Michael Harthorne

Drexie Malone stands near one of the Ballard Library gardens she stealthily maintained during the past five months.

Come hear the words of local poets Richard Kenney, Sharon Cumberland and Erin Malone as the Seattle Public Library, Fremont Branch hosts “Poetry in Fremont.”

The event takes place on Saturday, Sept. 26 from 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. at 731 N. 35th St.

Kenney, teaches poetry and verse writing at the University of Washington and has also published four books of his poetry. These books include, “The Evolution of the Flightless Bird,” “Orrery,” “The Intervention of the Zero” and “The One-Strand River.”

Cumberland is an associate professor of American literature and poetry at Seattle University.

Malone, taught writing at the University of Colorado, the Richard Hugo House and the University of Washington Rome Center in Italy. Her writing achievements include the publication of the chapbook, “What Sound Does It Make.”
 
Free for all and open to the public, no registration is required.

For more information call the branch at 684-4084.

09/16/2009

A reminder that the Seattle Public Library system will be closed Aug. 31 through Sept. 7

All Library locations will be closed Monday, Aug. 31 through Sunday, Sept. 6 due to citywide budget cuts.

Also, note that Monday, Sept. 7 is the Labor Day holiday and all libraries will be closed. Regular Library operations will resume Tuesday, Sept. 8.

No library services will be available during the one-week closure. Learn more here.

No library computers will be available. Here is a list of north locations with free internet access: http://www.spl.org/closure/computer_access_north.pdf.

The systemwide closure, along with other cuts, will help the library meet a two percent budget reduction - about $1 million, according to the city, and the closure will save approximately $655,000.

To leave a comment for the city librarian or the library board, call 206-233-3905.

08/31/2009

A reminder that the Seattle Public Library system will be closed Aug. 31 through Sept. 7

All Library locations will be closed Monday, Aug. 31 through Sunday, Sept. 6 due to citywide budget cuts.

Also, note that Monday, Sept. 7 is the Labor Day holiday and all libraries will be closed. Regular Library operations will resume Tuesday, Sept. 8.

No library services will be available during the one-week closure. Learn more here.

No library computers will be available. Here is a list of south locations with free internet access: http://www.spl.org/closure/computer_access_south.pdf.

The systemwide closure, along with other cuts, will help the library meet a two percent budget reduction - about $1 million, according to the city, and the closure will save approximately $655,000.

To leave a comment for the city librarian or the library board, call 206-233-3905.

08/31/2009

When I moved to Ballard, the first thing that I looked for was the library. What can I say? I’m a voracious reader.

When I found it, I realized that Seattle was a city with very different priorities. The Ballard Public Library is not just an interesting building with a grass-covered roof, it is a multi-purpose facility that has become a destination for the people in the neighborhood.

According to the Seattle Public Library’s Web site, the Ballard Branch was opened in 2005, replacing the original Carnegie building (1904-1963) and the one on 24th Avenue Northwest (1963-2005).

Situated a block back from Market and across from Bartell’s as well as Ballard Commons Park, the Ballard Branch is in a prime spot.

I believe that the priorities of a community are reflected in how they treat their libraries. Some places can’t scrape together the money to keep their libraries open. Others create a lavish downtown library and leave the branches to rot.

06/11/2009
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Photo credit: 
Brian LeBlanc

The Ballard Library is one of the city's most popular branches.

June 6, Nikki McClure, "All in A Day" at the library, 2 p.m.

"All in a Day" is a picture book and has been popular at Secret Garden Books.

With text by Cynthia Rylant, and illustrations by paper artist Nikki McClure, the book is destined to delight read-alouders for years to come.

June 16, Carol Cassella, "Oxygen" at the library, 6:30 p.m.

During the fragile moments of surgery, Seattle anesthesiologist and writer Carol Cassella is not only aware of the scientific intricacies of the human body, but more importantly, understands the emotional complexities patients and doctors face when entering an operating room. This intimate and professional perspective was reflected in her exquisite and critically acclaimed debut, "Oxygen."

June 17, Jennifer Hahn, "Spirited Waters" at the library, 6:30 p.m.

Award-winning writer, naturalist, illustrator, avid wildharvester, and solo kayaker Jennifer Hahn will share slides and stories from her new book.

06/02/2009
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Photo credit: 
Rebekah Schilperoort

The Seattle Public Library is proposing several changes to its Rules of Conduct, which will be discussed at the next Library Board meeting May 27.

The Seattle Library system regularly reviews its Rules of Conduct to ensure they reflect the Library's needs for effectively managing behavior in its facilities to ensure they are safe, welcoming and clean for all customers and staff, according to a press release.

Ballard's branch of the public library system is in downtown Ballard at 5614 22nd Ave. N.W.

Changes being proposed include:

- Organizing the list of rules into categories of severity, from behavior that results in a first-time warning (sleeping, being barefoot, unattended items, etc.) to those that result in a one-year exclusion (alleged criminal behavior).

- Clarifying the rule against distributing literature, gathering signatures, soliciting contribution or conducting surveys without Library authorization to specifically include plazas outside library entrances.

05/22/2009
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Photo credit: 
File photo

The Ballard Library is located at 5614 22nd Ave. N.W. Seattle Public Libraries is considering changes to its Rules of Conduct.

The Seattle Public Library is proposing several changes to its Rules of Conduct, which will be discussed at the next Library Board meeting May 27.

The Seattle Library system regularly reviews its Rules of Conduct to ensure they reflect the Library's needs for effectively managing behavior in its facilities to ensure they are safe, welcoming and clean for all customers and staff, according to a press release.

West Seattle has four public library branches, including: Delridge (5423 Delridge Way S.W.), High Point (3411 S.W. Raymond St.), Southwest (9010 35th Ave. S.W.) and West Seattle (2306 42nd Ave. S.W.)

Changes being proposed include:

- Organizing the list of rules into categories of severity, from behavior that results in a first-time warning (sleeping, being barefoot, unattended items, etc.) to those that result in a one-year exclusion (alleged criminal behavior).

- Clarifying the rule against distributing literature, gathering signatures, soliciting contribution or conducting surveys without Library authorization to specifically include plazas outside library entrances.

05/22/2009
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Photo credit: 
File photo

Clerk Ayan Adam helps prepare the children's section of the expanded and renovated Southwest branch of the Seattle Public Library. The public library system is reviewing changes to its Rules of Conduct.

As the school year draws to a close and people make summer vacation plans, join Taproot Theatre Company at the Greenwood Library for some inspiration for summer reading.

On May 9, there will be a behind-the-scenes look at Taproot's upcoming play "Around the World in 80 Days," and check out the novel that inspired it while you’re there. The event takes place at the Greenwood Library on May 9 from 5 to 5:45 p.m.

At the event, director Scott Nolte and Taproot staff will talk about the many adaptations this Jules Verne novel has seen throughout the decades—more than a century—what makes this version by Mark Brown special, and more. Actors will also give the audience a sample of what they’ll see and experience during the mainstage production.

The free program begins at 5 p.m. at the Greenwood Library, located at 8016 Greenwood Ave. N. in Seattle’s Greenwood neighborhood.

"Around the World in 80 Days" runs from May 22 through June 20 at Taproot Theatre with low-price previews on May 20 and 21, plus a pay-what-you-can performance on May 27. For tickets, call Taproot Theatre’s box office at (206) 781-9707 or Ticketmaster at (206) 292-ARTS.

04/13/2009
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Photo credit: 
Luke Rutan

The average Ballardite, if asked where the library is, would tell you it’s right at the corner of Northwest 56th and 22nd Northwest, but, actually, Ballard has two.

Squeezed between Great Harvest Bakery and Tableau Gifts and Embellishments a small sandwich board will lead an individual down some creaky stairs and through a long hallway to the tucked away Seattle Metaphysical Library, 2220 N.W. Market St.

In what began at the Pike Place Market in 1961, the late Carrie Fisher and a few friends, all astrologers, created this library to offer "personal transformation, and evolving global consciousness" by providing access to metaphysical, trans-dimensional, rare and unusual material available to share with their friends, said Margaret Bartley, executive director of the Metaphysical Library.

Over the years, the library moved to a Capitol Hill location where a wealthy patron help to support the its $3,000 a month rent. Unfortunately, after the patron passed, the non-profit resource center could not afford the rent and opted to find a new location.

03/20/2009
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Photo credit: 
Michael Harthorne

Ballard's Seattle Metaphysical Library, tucked away at 2220 N.W. Market St., offers "personal transformation and evolving global consciousness." Click image for more photos.

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